Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Wednesday Hero

Brigadier Gen. James H. Howard
Brigadier Gen. James H. Howard
81 years old from Bay Pines, Florida
356th Fighter Squadron, 354th Fighter Group
April 13, 1913 - March 18, 1995
U.S. Air Force

This post was suggested by Michael

General, then Colonel, James Howard, was the only fighter pilot to be awarded the Medal Of Honor in the European theater of WWII.

From his citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy near Oschersleben, Germany, on 11 January 1944. On that day Col. Howard was the leader of a group of P-51 aircraft providing support for a heavy bomber formation on a long-range mission deep in enemy territory. As Col. Howard's group met the bombers in the target area the bomber force was attacked by numerous enemy fighters. Col. Howard, with his group, at once engaged the enemy and himself destroyed a German ME. 110. As a result of this attack Col. Howard lost contact with his group, and at once returned to the level of the bomber formation. He then saw that the bombers were being heavily attacked by enemy airplanes and that no other friendly fighters were at hand. While Col. Howard could have waited to attempt to assemble his group before engaging the enemy, he chose instead to attack single-handed a formation of more than 30 German airplanes. With utter disregard for his own safety he immediately pressed home determined attacks for some 30 minutes, during which time he destroyed 3 enemy airplanes and probably destroyed and damaged others. Toward the end of this engagement 3 of his guns went out of action and his fuel supply was becoming dangerously low. Despite these handicaps and the almost insuperable odds against him, Col. Howard continued his aggressive action in an attempt to protect the bombers from the numerous fighters. His skill, courage, and intrepidity on this occasion set an example of heroism which will be an inspiration to the U.S. Armed Forces


You can read more about Gen. Howard here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Monday, January 27, 2014

Music Monday

... And Dio gave us the salute \m/


Dio - Holy Diver
Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by Michael

Col. Roger Donlon
Col. Roger Donlon
79 years old from Saugerties, New York
7th Special Forces Group
U.S. Army
Monday, January 20, 2014

Music Monday

...Priest gave us the voice and look...


Judas Priest - Hell Bend For Leather
Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by Michael

Tech Sgt. Charles Coolidge
Tech Sgt. Charles Coolidge
92 years old from Chattanooga, Tennessee
3rd Battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division
U.S. Army

Tech Sgt. Charles Coolidge was born in 1921 in Tennessee, where he still live and works in the family business. In 2006 he was awarded the L├ęgion d'honneur by officials of the French consulate.

From his Medal Of Honor citation:
Leading a section of heavy machine guns supported by 1 platoon of Company K, he took a position near Hill 623, east of Belmont sur Buttant, France, on October 24, 1944, with the mission of covering the right flank of the 3d Battalion and supporting its action. T/Sgt. Coolidge went forward with a Sergeant of Company K to reconnoiter positions for coordinating the fires of the light and heavy machine guns. They ran into an enemy force in the woods estimated to be an infantry company. T/Sgt. Coolidge, attempting to bluff the Germans by a show of assurance and boldness called upon them to surrender, whereupon the enemy opened fire. With his carbine, T/Sgt. Coolidge wounded 2 of them. There being no officer present with the force, T/Sgt. Coolidge at once assumed command. Many of the men were replacements recently arrived; this was their first experience under fire. T/Sgt. Coolidge, unmindful of the enemy fire delivered at close range, walked along the position, calming and encouraging his men and directing their fire. The attack was thrown back. Through 25 and October 26, the enemy launched repeated attacks against the position of this combat group but each was repulsed due to T/Sgt. Coolidge's able leadership. On October 27, German infantry, supported by 2 tanks, made a determined attack on the position. The area was swept by enemy small arms, machine gun, and tank fire. T/Sgt. Coolidge armed himself with a bazooka and advanced to within 25 yards of the tanks. His bazooka failed to function and he threw it aside. Securing all the hand grenades he could carry, he crawled forward and inflicted heavy casualties on the advancing enemy. Finally it became apparent that the enemy, in greatly superior force, supported by tanks, would overrun the position. T/Sgt. Coolidge, displaying great coolness and courage, directed and conducted an orderly withdrawal, being himself the last to leave the position. As a result of T/Sgt. Coolidge's heroic and superior leadership, the mission of this combat group was accomplished throughout 4 days of continuous fighting against numerically superior enemy troops in rain and cold and amid dense woods.


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Monday, January 13, 2014

Music Monday

Sabbath gave us the sound...


Black Sabbath - Paranoid
Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by Michael

Maj. Richard Bong
Maj. Richard Bong
24 years old from Poplar, Wisconsin
49th Fighter Group, V Fighter Command
September 25, 1920 - August 6, 1945
U.S. Army Air Force

Maj. Richard Bong is the United States' highest-scoring air ace, having shot down at least 40 Japanese aircraft during World War II. He was a fighter pilot in the U.S. Army Air Forces (USAAF) and a recipient of the Medal of Honor. All of his aerial victories were in the P-38 Lightning fighter aircraft.


You can read more on Maj. Bong here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Monday, January 6, 2014

Music Monday

What better way to start the new year, or almost a week into, than with some Acca Dacca?


AC/DC - Jailbreak