Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by Michael

Lt. Col. Jerry Coleman
Lt. Col. Jerry Coleman
89 years old from San Diego, California
VMSB-341, VMA-323
September 14, 1924 - January 5, 2014
U.S. Marines

Not only was Jerry Coleman a pro-baseball player, playing for the Yankees from 1949 to 1957, but he was also a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marines. Coleman postponed his entry in to the MLB to join the Marines. He flew 120 missions in WWII and Korea and earned two Distinguished Flying Crosses and thirteen Air Medals.


You can read more about Lt. Col. Coleman here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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Monday, April 21, 2014

Music Monday

In all the time, years, I've been doing Music Monday I've only done one Zeppelin song. I have no excuse or defense for this.


Led Zeppelin - Thank You (Live)
Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by SJ

2nd Lt. Walter Ehlers
2nd Lt. Walter Ehlers
92 years old from Long Beach, California
18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
May 7, 1921 - February 20, 2014
U.S. Army

On February 20 2nd Lt. Walter Ehlers passed away. 2nd Lt. Ehlers was the last surviving Medal Of Honor recipient from D-Day.

From his MoH citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 9–10 June 1944, near Goville, France. S/Sgt. Ehlers, always acting as the spearhead of the attack, repeatedly led his men against heavily defended enemy strong points exposing himself to deadly hostile fire whenever the situation required heroic and courageous leadership. Without waiting for an order, S/Sgt. Ehlers, far ahead of his men, led his squad against a strongly defended enemy strong point, personally killing 4 of an enemy patrol who attacked him en route. Then crawling forward under withering machinegun fire, he pounced upon the guncrew and put it out of action. Turning his attention to 2 mortars protected by the crossfire of 2 machineguns, S/Sgt. Ehlers led his men through this hail of bullets to kill or put to flight the enemy of the mortar section, killing 3 men himself. After mopping up the mortar positions, he again advanced on a machinegun, his progress effectively covered by his squad. When he was almost on top of the gun he leaped to his feet and, although greatly outnumbered, he knocked out the position single-handed. The next day, having advanced deep into enemy territory, the platoon of which S/Sgt. Ehlers was a member, finding itself in an untenable position as the enemy brought increased mortar, machinegun, and small arms fire to bear on it, was ordered to withdraw. S/Sgt. Ehlers, after his squad had covered the withdrawal of the remainder of the platoon, stood up and by continuous fire at the semicircle of enemy placements, diverted the bulk of the heavy hostile fire on himself, thus permitting the members of his own squad to withdraw. At this point, though wounded himself, he carried his wounded automatic rifleman to safety and then returned fearlessly over the shell-swept field to retrieve the automatic rifle which he was unable to carry previously. After having his wound treated, he refused to be evacuated, and returned to lead his squad. The intrepid leadership, indomitable courage, and fearless aggressiveness displayed by S/Sgt. Ehlers in the face of overwhelming enemy forces serve as an inspiration to others.


You can read more about 2nd Lt. Ehlers here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Monday, April 14, 2014

Music Monday

One of the greatest hard rock/metal songs of all time.


Accept - Balls To The Wall
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by Steve

Rear Admiral Eugene Fluckey
Rear Admiral Eugene Fluckey
93 years old from Annapolis, Maryland
October 5, 1913 - June 28, 2007
U.S. Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Barb during her 11th war patrol along the east coast of China from 19 December 1944 to 15 February 1945. After sinking a large enemy ammunition ship and damaging additional tonnage during a running 2-hour night battle on 8 January, Comdr. Fluckey, in an exceptional feat of brilliant deduction and bold tracking on 25 January, located a concentration of more than 30 enemy ships in the lower reaches of Nankuan Chiang (Mamkwan Harbor). Fully aware that a safe retirement would necessitate an hour's run at full speed through the uncharted, mined, and rock-obstructed waters, he bravely ordered, "Battle station — torpedoes!" In a daring penetration of the heavy enemy screen, and riding in 5 fathoms [9 m] of water, he launched the Barb's last forward torpedoes at 3,000 yard [2.7 km] range. Quickly bringing the ship's stern tubes to bear, he turned loose 4 more torpedoes into the enemy, obtaining 8 direct hits on 6 of the main targets to explode a large ammunition ship and cause inestimable damage by the resultant flying shells and other pyrotechnics. Clearing the treacherous area at high speed, he brought the Barb through to safety and 4 days later sank a large Japanese freighter to complete a record of heroic combat achievement, reflecting the highest credit upon Comdr. Fluckey, his gallant officers and men, and the U.S. Naval Service.


You can ready more about Rear Admiral Fluckey here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Monday, April 7, 2014

Music Monday

Gospel isn't my style of music, but I was recently in the car with my mom and she had this playing and I really liked it.


Vern Gosdin - I'll Fly Away
Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by SJ

SSgt. William Guarnere
SSgt. William Guarnere
90 years old from Philadelphia, Penn.
Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division
April 28, 1923 - March 8, 2014
U.S. Army

SSgt. William "Wild Bill" Guarnere passed away three weeks ago at the age of 90. SSgt. Guarnere was part of Easy Company, made famous by the HBO mini-series "Band Of Brothers". During his three years of service, SSgt. Guarnere saw action throughout Europe, including being part of the invasion of Normandy on D-Day. He was awarded the Silver and Bronze stars, the Purple Heart and the French Liberation Medal.


You can read more about SSgt. Guarnere here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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