Thursday, March 1, 2007

Wednesday Hero Post

To post the Wednesday Hero post to your site is a bit of a bother but it's simple. Just copy the italicized text below and paste it to your site. Where you see the < character you'll notice that there's a space between it and the next character. Just do away with that space to close the tag. That's it. Like I said, a bit of a bother but simple.


< center>< img src="http://oi58.tinypic.com/5nir82.jpg" border="1" alt="Cpt. Nathan J. Nylander">< /center>< /img>< center>< I>Cpt. Nathan J. Nylander
35 years old fromHockley, Texas
438th Expeditionary Wing
Jan. 23, 1976 - Apr. 27, 2011
< img src="http://oi62.tinypic.com/wb291v.jpg" alt="U.S. Air Force">< /img>

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) (Posthumously) to Captain Nathan J. Nylander, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with ground combat operations as an Advisor, NATO Air Training Command-Afghanistan/438th Air Expeditionary Wing, NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan and Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM on 27 April 2011. On the morning of 27 April, an assailant opened fire upon United States personnel shooting seven U.S. Air Force Airmen and one American civilian contractor. Despite an extremely uncertain tactical situation, and with disregard for his own safety, Captain Nylander went to the Air Command and Control Center (ACCC), Afghan Air Force (AAF) Headquarters in response to the shooting. He responded when the gunman began shooting as he was with four other Airmen and eight Afghan personnel in a conference room adjoining the ACCC. Captain Nylander could have exited the building to safety, but chose instead to return and assist his fellow Airmen. Captain Nylander then engaged the gunman, wounding the assailant and when he remained on the floor motionless, Captain Nylander approached the other rooms. The gunman arose and went into a room across the hall from the conference room. When the gunman re-emerged into the hallway, Captain Nylander engaged the assailant again and during this exchange of gunfire, Captain Nylander sustained wounds to his left and right thighs. Although seriously wounded and bleeding heavily, he continued to engage the gunman until his weapon jammed. When he attempted to exit the rear entrance of the AAF Headquarters, he was killed by the gunman. Captain Nylander's brave actions degraded the gunman's capability and likely prevented further loss of life, including that of other U.S. personnel who remained in the AAF Headquarters. By his bold initiative, undaunted courage, and complete dedication to duty, Captain Nylander gallantly gave his life for his country and reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan and Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan, and the United States Air Force. NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: Captain Nathan J. Nylander, United States Air Force, distinguished himself by gallantry performed with marked distinction as an Advisor and member of the NATO Air Training Command-Afghanistan/438th Air Expeditionary Wing, NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan and Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan during OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM. On the morning of 27 April 2011, a renegade Afghan Air Force officer entered the Air Command and Control Center (ACCC), Afghan Air Force (AAF) Headquarters and opened fire with a 9-mm. pistol, shooting seven U.S. Air Force Airmen and one American civilian contractor. When the gunman began shooting, Captain Nylander was with four other Airmen and eight Afghan personnel in a conference room adjoining the ACCC. At the sound of the gunshots, he moved toward the door between the AAAC and the conference room. With Captain Bradley and Captain Cheslak providing cover, Captain Nylander evacuated the conference room. After exiting the conference room, he could have continued to safety, but chose instead to return and assist his fellow Airmen. He took up a firing position next to Captain Bradley in the hallway when the gunman emerged from the ACCC. Captain Bradley and Captain Nylander engaged the gunman with their 9-mm. pistols, wounding him at least once and possibly twice. When the gunman remained on the floor and did not move, Captain Bradley made eye contact with Captain Nylander, gave him a signal to withdraw, and then exited the building. Although the tactical situation was extremely uncertain, Captain Nylander chose to remain in the building and did not withdraw. While Captain Nylander was likely in the conference room or ACCC, the gunman got up and went into a room across the hall from the conference room. When the gunman re-emerged into the hallway, Captain Nylander engaged the gunman again with his 9-mm.. During this exchange, Captain Nylander was shot in the left thigh and sustained a grazing wound to his right thigh. Bleeding from his wounds, Captain Nylander began to move toward the rear entrance of the AAF Headquarters. Although seriously wounded and bleeding heavily, Captain Nylander continued to engage the gunman until his 9-mm. jammed. He cleared two rounds from his weapon and the final round was found jammed in the chamber. When Captain Nylander attempted to exit the rear entrance of the AAF Headquarters, he was killed by the gunman. Of his own volition, Captain Nylander chose to return to an extremely dangerous and unknown tactical situation and engage an attacker who had taken the lives of eight fellow Americans. After an initial exchange of gunfire, Captain Nylander again chose to stay, with the likely intent of aiding the fallen. Captain Nylander's brave actions degraded the gunman's capability and likely prevented further loss of life, including that of other U.S. personnel who remained in the AAF Headquarters. His distinct gallantry while engaged with a hostile attacker, exemplifies loyalty, selfless service, and personal courage. By his bold initiative, undaunted courage, and complete dedication to duty, Captain Nylander gallantly gave his life for his country and reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the NATO Training Mission–Afghanistan and Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan, and the United States Air Force.< /center>< /I>

You can read more < a href="http://projects.militarytimes.com/valor/air-force-capt-nathan-j-nylander/6394141">here< /a>

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. < FONT COLOR=red>< FONT SIZE=2>Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look< /FONT SIZE>< /FONT COLOR>

< a href="http://helpwwp.org">Wounded Warrior Project< /a> - Because So Many Have Come Back With Injuries, Seen And Unseen

< b>This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go < a href="http://rightwingrightminded.blogspot.com/2006/08/wednesday-hero-blogroll.html">here< /a>.< /B> < center>< img src="http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/8360/whlogo.jpg" border="1" alt="Wednesday Hero Logo">< /center>< /img>

4 comments:

Meaghan said...

I am the oldest great-grandchild of Sgt. McGowen. I want to thank you for featuring him today. It touches my heart greatly.

Christopher Lee said...

It's my pleasure.

Mike Golch said...

I hope that I copied this right,if not Maybe Sandee will be kind enought to fix it for me again.
I do not know how to do html.

Lady D said...

Thanks for the post- very sad, very emotional, very gut wrenching. I am glad I can honor them on my blog.