Sunday, April 27, 2008

Gitmo Made Me Crazy

Salim Ahmed Hamdan has been driven mad while detained at Gitmo. At least according to his lawyer.
They say Hamdan, already the subject of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, has essentially been driven insane by solitary confinement in a tiny cell where he spends at least 22 hours a day, goes to the bathroom and eats all his meals. His defense team says he is suicidal, hears voices, has flashbacks, talks to himself and says the restrictions of Guantánamo "boil his mind."
These are people who strap bombs to themselves, mentally disabled women and children. They're already insane. You know what this Hamdan needs? He need a weekend pass. Let him go to Havana during the weekends so he can clear his mind and stop his brain from boiling.

3 comments:

R said...

"These are people who strap bombs to themselves"
well, it's hard to make the suicide-bomber claim about someone still alive.
It's also painfully obvious that the 'justice' and 'democracy' that america prides itself on, the 'presumption of innocence until proven otherwise' is only window-dressing.
The argument that people normally wheel-out to explain this is that 'terrorists aren't human - they don't deserve rights'...
The sad/funny thing about that is it has all the hallmarks of the tyrants that america claims to stand against.

If the guy is suspected of a crime, why not do the trial properly?
If this guy did something against me and mine, I'd want to see a legal process that doesn't resemble a lynching - I'd want to be sure - I'd want to see real process...

I've heard assertions (hype) that the military tribunals (or whatever they are calling them) are fair and just - much like real trials... if that is true, why not use real law/process... rather than cooking-up this atrocity.
If someone showed you/gave you details of americans being treated 'Gitmo' style by a foreign nation, you'd all be saying 'let's invade those bastards..'

Have a nice tyranny.

Indian Chris said...

Once again, you assume to know me and my thoughts.

If someone showed you/gave you details of americans being treated 'Gitmo' style by a foreign nation, you'd all be saying 'let's invade those bastards..'

If an American is caught working with al-Qaeda, like the people at Gitmo, in a foreign nation, kill 'em. I want Mr. Jones down the street to have a trial, but not Ahmed the sand nigger and his buddies. Remember, I'm American. I hate everyone not like me.

R said...

No I didn't assume to know your mind, I was just throwing it out there for public debate in much the same way you did, when you posted the article.
... but since you insist.

"If an American is caught working with al-Qaeda"

I'm not talking about an american caught working for al Qaeda, if an american were treated that way for breaking some local law in foreign land (not that an american being suspected of working for al Qaeda should mean they forfeit legal/human rights), the general mood in american media (sorry for using the word 'you' previously) would be 'who does that little "turd world" country think it is? We ought 'to bomb them back to the stone age'

"I want Mr. Jones down the street to have a trial, but not Ahmed the sand nigger and his buddies. Remember, I'm American. I hate everyone not like me."

Looks like sarcasm, sounds like sarcasm, but post after post on Islam = terrorism (and you've insisted on making it about Jones versus Ahmed, when the topic has been that hell-hole reserved for sub-human detainees, sorry, 'terrorists').
In your jest I think you speak your mind. I had no intention of revisiting the pre-occupation of some RWRM contributors with Islam and terrorism, I just want to know why/how someone can forfeit their rights under law; the more heinous the crime the more strictly legal principles should be applied.
america is off selling 'democracy' and 'justice' overseas, yet don't want justice in their own backyard, just want someone to be guilty and to suffer.

If these people are guilty, prove it properly, not with some torture-driven witch-hunt in sub-human settings, with sub-standard legal processes.