Monday, July 7, 2008

You Better Eat That Hummus You Racist Little Git

Toddlers who say "yuck" when given flavorful foreign food may be exhibiting racist behavior, a British government-sponsored organization says.
Really? Don't you just love political correctness. Not only are we becoming dumber as a people, but we're just plain becoming more ignorant.

4 comments:

R said...

The key word is 'may'
that they 'may' be learning racist attitudes...
that they may have a 'lager-lout' father who says "yuck, what is this foreign shitte?" if he isn't faced with meat and three veg, or 'fish and chips' on Friday, despite the English have the most dreadful food on the planet (at least american franchised 'food' is loaded-up with sugar, caffeine, salt, and fat... that you'll 'get a buzz' while it kills you, rather than being bored to death while waiting for the heart-attack...
Fortunately they aren't the only two options...
(It's great that xenophobes have an in-built 'self destruct mechanism')

Kids learn attitudes somewhere, and demonstrating a dislike of things different may reveal that they are surrounded bigots, but as the word is 'may'

Goldwater said...

They "may" also just not like the taste and be undeserving of the p.c. Nazi state punishing them for something so silly. My girlfriend is allergic to chilli, so under this guideline, if she tried it and went into a fit that would mean she was an uber-racist.

Indian Chris said...

Come on, Goldwater. That's just silly. Logic has no place in the world today. If 13 month old Basil doesn't like the taste of his Gaeng Hanglay, it's because he hates those slant eye devils and wants nothing to do with them.

R said...

"They "may" also just not like the taste and be undeserving of the p.c. Nazi state punishing them for something so silly. My girlfriend is allergic to chilli, so under this guideline, if she tried it and went into a fit that would mean she was an uber-racist."

You would have been fine if you left it at 'may not like the taste' (366 pages, I sincerely doubt a researcher worth their salt would have missed that as one of the many possibilities).

'May' contains possibilities, not certainties...
I see you've both managed to confuse possibilities with absolutes.
As for logic... it went on holiday when someone confused possible learned social behaviour of infants with the complex chemistry of allergies in adults, or young Basil's dislike of a particular dish with a singular hatred of 'the yellow peril'.

Read the report if you want to find holes in it, to rely on the monumental over-simplification of a 366 page report by moron-media would be well...